JOURNEY: MAKING OF BUDOKAN + FULL CONCERT

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

ANY WAY YOU WANT IT (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

DON‘T STOP BELIEVIN’ (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

FAITHFULLY (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

KEEP ON RUNNIN’ (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

OPEN ARMS (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

RUBICON (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

SEPARATE WAYS (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

STILL THEY RIDE (BUDOKAN)

BUDOKAN HALL
TOKYO, JAPAN
3.2.1983

JOURNEY: LIVE IN PHILADELPHIA, PA

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

AFTER THE FALL (JFK)

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

CHAIN REACTION (JFK)

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

OPEN ARMS (JFK)

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

SEND HER MY LOVE (JFK)

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

STILL THEY RIDE (JFK)

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

WHEEL IN THE SKY (JFK)

JFK STADIUM
PHILADELPHIA, PA
6.4.1983

July 8, 1983 – Reunion Arena. Dallas TX – Bryan Adams

July 9, 1983 – Reunion Arena. Dallas TX – Bryan Adams

July 10, 1983 – Reunion Arena. Dallas TX – Bryan Adams

July 12, 1983 – Kemper Arena. Kansas City, MO – Bryan Adams

July 13, 1983 – Kemper Arena. Kansas City, MO – Bryan Adams

July 14, 1983 – Kansas Coliseum. Wichita KN – Bryan Adams

July 16, 1983 – Mid-South Coliseum. Memphis, TN – Bryan Adams

July 17, 1983 – City Park Stadium. New Orleans, LA – Bryan Adams

July 19, 1983 – Lloyd Noble Center, Norman OK – Bryan Adams

July 20, 1983 – Lloyd Noble Center, Norman OK – Bryan Adams

July 21, 1983 – Lloyd Noble Center, Norman OK – Bryan Adams  

“Still They Ride” 7.21.1983

July 23, 1983 – Tingley Coliseum. Albuquerque, NM – Bryan Adams

July 24, 1983 – Veteran’s Coliseum. Phoenix, AZ – Bryan Adams

July 25, 1983 – Veteran’s Coliseum. Phoenix, AZ – Bryan Adams

July 26, 1983 – Veteran’s Coliseum. Phoenix, AZ – Bryan Adams

July 30, 1983 – Oakland Coliseum. Oakland, CA – Bryan Adams, Eddie Money, Night Ranger, Triumph 

Full Concert Audio 7.30.1983

July 31, 1983 – Radcliffe Stadium. Fresno, CA – Bryan Adams, Eddie Money

August 5, 1983 – Los Angeles Forum. Los Angeles, CA – Bryan Adams

August 6, 1983 – Los Angeles Forum. Los Angeles, CA – Bryan Adams

August 7, 1983 – Los Angeles Forum. Los Angeles, CA – Bryan Adams

August 9, 1983 – Los Angeles Forum. Los Angeles, CA – Bryan Adams

August 10, 1983 – Los Angeles Forum. Los Angeles, CA – Bryan Adams

August 11,1983 – San Diego Sports Center. San Diego, CA – Bryan Adams

August 13, 1983 – Aladdin Theater. Las Vegas, NV – Bryan Adams

August 14, 1983 – Aladdin Theater. Las Vegas, NV – Bryan Adams

August 16, 1983 – State U. College. Boise, ID – Bryan Adams

August 17, 1983 – Mini Dome. Pocatello ID – Bryan Adams

August 18, 1983 – Beasly Coliseum. Pullman, WA – Bryan Adams

August 19, 1983 – Tacoma Dome. Tacoma WA – Bryan Adams

August 21, 1983 – Autzen Stadium. Eugene, OR – Sequel, Bryan Adams, Sammy Hagar

September 1, 1983 – Blaisdell Arena. Honolulu, HI

September 2, 1983 – Blaisdell Arena. Honolulu, HI

September 3, 1983 – Blaisdell Arena. Honolulu, HI

September 4, 1983 – Blaisdell Arena. Honolulu, HI

September 6, 1983 – Blaisdell Arena. Honolulu, HI

Neal Schon
Lead guitar and vocals. Neal is admired and respected by his fans as well as his peers. He lives, dreams and breathes with his guitar. If this instrument hadn’t been invented, he would have found a way to build one himself. He’s a true master who pursues hi obsession with reverence and love usually bestowed upon gods. Neal is currently enjoying the success of his second solo release Schon & Hammer, Here To Stay on Columbia Records.

Jonathan Cain
Keyboards, guitars and vocals. No longer referred to the new kid in town, Jonathan has proven himself in every way. In addition to his incredible song writing abilities and sparking musicianship on the keyboards and guitar, his genuine enthusiasm for excellence has been a key factor in the skyrocketing success of the band. He recently produced his wife’s debut album for RCA Records entitled Tane Cain.

Steve Smith
Drums. Blessed with perpetual energy, Steve displays a rare combination of enthusiasm, love and aggression in his “daily assault” on the drums. When “Crunch” takes the stage at night, he’s a classic example of poetry in motion. He is currently finishing his first solo LP project entitled Vital Information.

Ross Valory
Bass and vocals. When he is not working on his video projects, Ross is building the solid foundation necessary for every Journey composition. Considered a bassist’s bassist, he also possesses one of the most bizarre senses of humor known to modern man. Ross is a true rock veteran, and a man who keep looking toward the future.

Steve Perry
Lead Vocals. Steve possess one of the most identifiable voices in music today. He can sing with all the fury of a hurricane or seduce an audience with a passionate ballad. He’s the ultimate showman and the consummate composer and singer. If he looks like he really love’s what he’s doing.its because he does.

FRONTIERS & BEYOND (DOCUMENTARY, NFL FILMS)

Written by: Phil Tuckett
Narrated by: John Facenda
Running Time: 98 Minutes

By Alan Siegel | Sports on Earth | December 18, 2013

On Dec. 13, 1981, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, the idea for the strangest project in NFL Films history was born. The 49ers were playing the Oilers that afternoon, and cameraman Phil Tuckett was on the sideline capturing the action. Early in the first half, he noticed someone following him. After a while, Tuckett turned to the burly stranger and said, “Hi, do I know you?”

“No,” the man responded. “But we’re huge fans of NFL Films.” His name was Pat Morrow, and he was Journey’s tour manager. Before shows, he told Tuckett, the Bay Area-based band watched NFL Films’ epic highlight videos. Now the group wanted to star in one of its own. “What we want to do is make a film just like one of your highlight films of a team headed for the Super Bowl,” explained Morrow, who was in town for the band’s two-night stint at the Cow Palace. “But it would be Journey headed toward a concert of their lives.”

The concept intrigued Tuckett. “As much as I loved football,” he told me, “I was a little burned out on it.” The former receiver had starred at his Utah high school, played at Weber State, then spent two seasons in the late ’60s with the San Diego Chargers, for whom he appeared in exactly one game. In 1969, he started at NFL Films, where he’d worked as a cameraman, writer, director, editor, and producer ever since. “It was a steady diet [of football],” he said. “And so I was always looking at the other possibilities.”

At halftime, he expressed interest to Morrow, who said, “We can put this deal together in a hurry.” The next day, when Tuckett walked into his office at NFL Films headquarters in Mount Laurel, N.J., a box filled with Journey hats, mugs, and blankets was waiting for him. He remembers thinking: Yeah, these people are for real.

Journey manager Herbie Herbert quickly helped broker an agreement. This was no small feat, especially considering that NFL Films Ed Sabol founder liked to call musicians “creeps and freaks.” On the other hand, his son Steve, then the organization’s executive vice president, had no qualms about working with outsiders. “We’re a young company,” he later told The New York Times, “I’m one of the oldest at 41 — so we liked the idea.”

It was settled: NFL Films would go on the road with Journey. “It was kind of a lark in a way,” Tuckett said. “But we put all our resources against it; the same kind of stuff we would’ve done for a football movie.” Naturally, that included narration by John Facenda. The Voice of God was so tickled by the assignment that he recorded the script in a Journey T-Shirt.

New Frontiers

In reality, the decision to make an arena rock documentary made plenty of sense. Every week, NFL Films crews endured bad weather, rowdy fans, and unhinged players and coaches — and still amassed impeccable footage. “Rock concerts and sports are a lot alike, in that so much happens spontaneously,” said Steve Sabol, who died in 2012 after a year-long fight with brain cancer. “You can’t set it up, and you can’t do retakes. A good cameraman has to shoot from the hip and catch everything the first time, which our people have learned to do in football.”

Since its inception in 1962, NFL Films has produced a seemingly endless stream of hypnotic, award-winning work. Salon’s Matt Zoller Seitz wasn’t wrong when he deemed it “the greatest in-house P.R. machine in pro sports history…an outfit that could make even a tedious stalemate seem as momentous as the battle for the Alamo.”

But not everything the company has done has been so damn self-serious. From the early 1980s through the turn of the millennium, it shot dozens of music videos. An almost comically diverse assortment of artists — including Def Leppard, Sister Sledge, Dio, Slayer, Cyndi Lauper, DJ Kool, the Black Crowes, Jon Secada, and Stevie Ray Vaughan — got the NFL Films treatment. “It encouraged off-the-wall kinds of approaches,” said Tuckett, who oversaw the company’s music projects for two decades. “And I think that we benefited from that. It got us out of our straight-laced NFL Films style and helped us become a little more contemporary.”

The experiment officially began in the spring of 1983, when NFL Films joined Journey on its American tour. The band, which had just released Frontiers, traveled by plane. The road crew, along with Tuckett’s gang, rolled along in buses. The arrangement had its advantages. “Really the most interesting stuff was with the road crew,” Tuckett said, “because that’s who we were hanging out with most of the time.”

Written and directed by Tuckett, Frontiers & Beyond has NFL Films’ fingerprints all over it. Facenda, in fine form, reminds the audience early in the film that it belongs not only to Journey, but also its crew. “This is their story, too,” he says in his signature baritone. “Together they are 70 modern day troubadours and roustabouts, crisscrossing the country in seven tractor trailers and three busses, towing the portable pieces of state-of-the-art rock and roll theater.” Fittingly, there’s also the use of slow motion, in this case not to showcase a balletic Lynn Swann catch, but to highlight lead singer Steve Perry’s facial expression during “Faithfully.”

Used by Permission | All Rights Reserved

February 22, 1983 – Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium. Nagoya, Japan

February 24, 1983 – Furitsu Tai. Osaka, Japan

February 25, 1983 – Furitsu Tai. Osaka, Japan

February 26, 1983 – Kyuden Memorial Gymnasium. Fukuoka, Japan

February 28, 1983 – Kaikan Hall. Kyoto, Japan

March 1, 1983 – Budokan Hall. Tokyo Japan

March 2, 1983 – Budokan Hall. Tokyo Japan

March 4, 1983 – Yukohama Gymnasium. Yokohama, Japan

March 28, 1983 – Seattle Coliseum. Seattle WA – Bryan Adams

March 30, 1983 – Bringham Young U. Provo, UT – Bryan Adams

March 31, 1983 – Salt Palace. Salt Lake City, UT – Bryan Adams

April 1, 1983 – Casper Events Center. Casper, WY – Bryan Adams

April 3, 1983 – McNichols Arena. Denver, CO – Bryan Adams

April 4, 1983 – McNichols Arena. Denver, CO – Bryan Adams

April 6, 1983 – Devaney Sports Center, U Nebraska. Lincoln NB – Bryan Adams

April 7, 1983 – Veterans Memorial Auditorium. Des Moines, IA – Bryan Adams

April 9, 1983 – Hulman Center. Ind. St. U., Terre Haute, IN – Bryan Adams

April 10, 1983 – Southern Illinois University Arena. Carbondale, IL – Bryan Adams

April 11, 1983 – The Checkerdome. St. Louis, MO – Bryan Adams

April 13, 1983 – Riverfront Arena. Cincinnati, OH – Bryan Adams

April 14, 1983 – Middle Tenn. State U., Murfreesboro, TN – Bryan Adams

April 15, 1983 – Middle Tenn. State U., Murfreesboro, TN – Bryan Adams

April 18, 1983 – Kansas Coliseum. Wichita, KS – Bryan Adams

April 20, 1983 – The Omni. Atlanta, GA – Bryan Adams

April 21, 1983 – The Omni. Atlanta, GA – Bryan Adams

April 23, 1983 – Tangerine Bowl. Orlando, FL – Bryan Adams, Sammy Hagar, Aerosmith

April 24, 1983 -Miami Baseball Stadium. Miami, FL – Bryan Adams, Sammy Hagar, Aerosmith

April 26, 1983 – The Coliseum. Charlotte, NC – Bryan Adams

April 27, 1983 – Jefferson Memorial. Birmingham, AL – Bryan Adams

April 28, 1983 – Municipal Auditorium., Mobile, AL – Bryan Adams

May 1, 1983 – Civic Center, Charleston, WV – Bryan Adams

May 2, 1983 – Capitol Center. Largo, MD – Bryan Adams

May 3, 1983 – Capitol Center. Largo, MD – Bryan Adams

May 5, 1983 – Meadowlands Arena, E. Rutherford, NJ – Bryan Adams

May 6, 1983 – Meadowlands Arena, E. Rutherford, NJ – Bryan Adams

May 7, 1983 – Meadowlands Arena, E. Rutherford, NJ – Bryan Adams

May 8, 1983 – Nassau Coliseum. Uniondale, NY – Bryan Adams

May 13, 1983 – Civic Center, Hartford, CN – Bryan Adams

May 14, 1983 – Civic Center, Hartford, CN – Bryan Adams

May 15, 1983 – Civic Center, Hartford, CN – Bryan Adams

May 17, 1983 – Centrum, Worcester, MA – Bryan Adams

May 18, 1983 – Centrum, Worcester, MA – Bryan Adams

May 19, 1983 – Centrum, Worcester, MA – Bryan Adams

May 20, 1983 – Centrum, Worcester, MA – Bryan Adams

May 22, 1983 – Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, NY – Bryan Adams

May 24, 1983 – Richfield Coliseum, Cleveland, OH – Bryan Adams

May 25, 1983 – Richfield Coliseum, Cleveland, OH – Bryan Adams

May 26, 1983 – Richfield Coliseum, Cleveland, OH – Bryan Adams

May 28, 1983 – Civic Arena, Pittsburgh, PA – Bryan Adams

May 29, 1983 – Civic Arena, Pittsburgh, PA – Bryan Adams

May 30, 1983 – Rupp Arena, Lexington, KY – Bryan Adams

June 1, 1983 – Market Square Arena, Indianapolis IN – Bryan Adams

June 2, 1983 – Notre Dame ACC, South Bend, IN – Bryan Adams

June 4, 1983 – JFK Stadium, Philadelphia, PA – Bryan Adams, The Tubes, Sammy Hagar, John Cougar

June 5, 1983 – Hollander Stadium, Rochester, NY – Bryan Adams

June 10, 1983 – Rosemont Horizon, Chicago, IL – Bryan Adams

June 11, 1983 – Rosemont Horizon, Chicago, IL – Bryan Adams

June 12, 1983 – Rosemont Horizon, Chicago, IL – Bryan Adams

June 14, 1983 – SPAC. Saratoga Springs, NY – Bryan Adams

June 15, 1983 – SPAC. Saratoga Springs, NY – Bryan Adams

June 17, 1983 -Alpine Valley Amphitheater. E. Troy, WI – Bryan Adams

June 18, 1983 – St. Paul Civic Center, St. Paul, MN – Bryan Adams

June 19, 1983 – St. Paul Civic Center, St. Paul, MN – Bryan Adams

June 21,  1983 – St. Paul Civic Center, St. Paul, MN – Bryan Adams

June 23, 1983 – Joe Louis Arena. Detroit, MI – Bryan Adams

June 24, 1983 – Joe Louis Arena. Detroit, MI – Bryan Adams

June 25, 1983 – Joe Louis Arena. Detroit, MI – Bryan Adams

June 26, 1983 – Legend Valley, OH – Bryan Adams

July 1, 1983 – The Summit. Houston, TX – Bryan Adams

July 2, 1983 – The Summit. Houston, TX – Bryan Adams

July 3, 1983 – The Summit. Houston, TX – Bryan Adams

July 5, 1983 – Frank Erwin Sorts Center. Austin TX – Bryan Adams

July 6, 1983 – San Antonio Arena. San Antonio, TX – Bryan Adams

The idiom that “people make the difference” is all too true when it comes to the success of Journey. The release of Escape alone has propelled the band from superstar status to into music legends by selling more than five million records. Acknowledging this, one may suspect Journey to have realized their potential. Not so! And it is you the audience who help Journey to grow and develop, fine tuning their already classic sound. Journey has truly escaped to new frontiers. Their tenth album for Columbia records is now being presented to you in live performance and continues the musical evolution begun nearly six years ago with the release of Infinity.

The new Frontier is being able to discover within yourself a potential direction to a successful and brighter future. Graphically speaking, the tunnel into the head and mind on the album and program cover represents a connection between the past, present and future an entrance to a place where possibilities are unlimited.

When Infinity was released, the band introduced a new singer that would explode with talent and expose the band to a new audience as well. The tunes became more song-structured and Neal Schon’s brilliant guitar prowess was elevated to even greater heights. As Journey’s album turned vinyl not only in technical superiority, but in the intensity of the performance itself. Steve Smith was selected to replace the original drummer, Aynsley Dunbar and, together with Ross Valory, the backbeat to Journey’s sound was complete. The addition of ex-Baby’s keyboardist, Jonathan Cain came in 1981 when Gregg Rolie decided to retire from the group. It was the combined efforts of this team that catapulted the band into history books. But what’s nice is that the band is still creating new Frontiers.

Life on the road with Journey is nonstop excitement but the creative process of writing new songs and perfecting their stage shows is a full-time occupation. All of the members of the band are constantly visualizing and creating new horizons for Journey.